Wisconsin School of Business

Sarada

Assistant Professor - Management & Human Resources

**The most current versions of my CV, research and teaching can be accessed through my personal website: https://sites.google.com/site/saradaeconomist/home

I am an Assistant Professor in Management and Economics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. My research is focused on the economics of entrepreneurship and innovation.

My work in entrepreneurship looks at who becomes an entrepreneur, the financial incentives they face in doing so, and the factors that determine entrepreneurial success. From a public policy perspective, I study how entrepreneurship has influenced economic mobility in the US, and how tax policy can be designed to incentivize innovation and risk-taking in entrepreneurship (versus to motivate income shifting between the personal and corporate bases).

My work in innovation focuses on understanding the demographics of inventors over the past 150 years, and it's implications for the direction of invention. From a firm perspective, I study how hiring practices reflect technology adoption. Combining these individual and firm level factors, I study how creative, inventive and entrepreneurial activity relate to each other across US geographies, and how these correspond to economic development.

My labor market experience includes work in litigation consulting, and teaching in management, finance and economics departments - at the undergraduate, MA/MS and MBA levels. The courses I have taught include Entrepreneurial Finance, Entrepreneurial Growth Strategies, Corporate Finance and Managerial Economics. I received my undergraduate degree in economics and statistics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and my PhD in economics from the University of California, San Diego.
 

Selected Accepted Journal Articles


Sarada, & Gordon, R. (2019). The role of the corporate tax. Elements in Public Economics, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Sarada, & Ziebarth, N. & Andrews, M. (2019). Changes in the Demographics of American Inventors, 1870-1940. Explorations in Economic History
Tocoian, O. (2018). Is it all about who you know? Prior work connections and entrepreneurial success. Industrial and Labor Relations Review

Selected Published Journal Articles


Gordon, R. (2018). How should taxes be designed to encourage entrepreneurship. Journal of Public Economics (166), 1-11.

Undergraduate Courses


Entrepreneurial Finance
Course DescriptionDiscusses the tools helpful for financing new ventures, with emphasis on their applications. The course also helps students understand the institutional setting that has an impact on the financing conditions of new ventures.
(FIN 457 Section 001), Fall 2015.



Photograph of  Sarada

Sarada

 
Assistant Professor | Management & Human Resources
(608) 262-2494
4297 Grainger Hall