Wisconsin School of Business

Evan Polman

Assistant Professor - Marketing

Evan Polman joined the Wisconsin School of Business as an Assistant Professor in 2013. He received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 2010, and afterward carried out his post-doctoral work at the Stern School of Business at New York University. His research focuses on self-other differences in decision making, creativity, emotions, and moral psychology. He has published in journals such as Psychological Science, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. His research has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Huffington Post, Fast Company, and Harvard Business Review.
 

Selected Published Journal Articles


Polman, E. & Maglio, S. (2017). Mere gifting: Liking a gift more because it is shared. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.
Maglio, S. & Polman, E. (2016). Revising probability estimates: Why increasing likelihood means increasing impact. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (111), 141-158.
Huang, N. & Burtch, G. & Hong, Y. & Polman, E. (2016). Effects of multiple psychological distances on construal and consumer evaluation: A field study of online reviews. Journal of Consumer Psychology (26), 474-482.
Polman, E. & Vohs, K. (2016). Decision fatigue, choosing for others, and self-construal. Social Psychological and Personality Science (7), 471-478.
Maglio, S. & Polman, E. (2014). Spatial orientation shrinks and expands psychological distance. Psychological Science (25), 1345-1352.
Polman, E. & Kim, S. (2013). Effects of anger, disgust, and sadness on sharing with others. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin (39), 1683-1692.
Polman, E. & Pollmann, M. & Poehlman, T. (2013). The name-letter-effect in groups: Sharing initials with group members increases the quality of group work. PLoS ONE (8), e79039.
Polman, E. & Pettit, N. & Wiesenfeld, B. (2013). Effects of wrongdoer status on moral licensing. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology (49), 614-623.
Polman, E. (2012). Self-other decision making and loss aversion. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes (119), 141-150.
Polman, E. & Russo, J. (2012). Commitment to a developing preference and predecisional distortion of information. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes (119), 78-88.
Polman, E. (2012). Effects of self-other decision making on regulatory focus and choice overload. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (102), 980-993.
Polman, E. & Ruttan, R. (2012). Effects of anger, guilt, and envy on moral hypocrisy. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin (38), 129-139.
Leung, A. & Kim, S. & Polman, E. & Ong, L. & Qiu, L. & Goncalo, J. & Sanchez-Burks, J. (2012). Embodied metaphors and creative 'acts'. Psychological Science (23), 502-509.
Polman, E. & Emich, K. (2011). Decisions for others are more creative than decisions for the self. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin (37), 492-501.
Goncalo, J. & Polman, E. & Maslach, C. (2010). When confidence comes too soon: Collective efficacy, conflict and group performance over time. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes (113), 12-24.
Polman, E. (2010). Information distortion in self-other decision making. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology (46), 432-435.
Polman, E. (2010). Why are maximizers less happy than satisficers? Because they maximize positive and negative outcomes. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making (23), 179-190.

Photograph of Evan Polman

Evan Polman

 
Assistant Professor | Marketing
(608) 262-1942
4255 Grainger Hall