Thursday, September 29, 2011 Wisconsin Real Estate Viewpoint Blog
Nobel laureate in economic sciences to visit campus next week by Graaskamp Center Staff
Professor Elinor Ostrom, American economist and 2009 Nobel Laureate in Economic Sciences, is visiting our campus on October 6th as part of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Hilldale Lecture Series. A Wikipedia entry describes her as "one of the leading scholars in the study of common pool resources (CPR). In particular, Ostrom's work emphasizes how humans interact with ecosystems to maintain long-term sustainable resource yields. Common pool resources include many forests, fisheries, oil fields, grazing lands, and irrigation systems." In 2009, she received the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel "for her analysis of economic governance, especially the commons."

"The Hilldale Lecture Series, inaugurated in 1973-74, is sponsored by the faculty's four divisional committees - Arts and Humanities, Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences, and Social Studies - - and funded by the university's Hilldale Fund. The series gives each division the unique opportunity to present to the university community distinguished thinkers whose contributions to contemporary culture and science have received international recognition and acclaim. All lectures are free and open to the public." (from the Secretary of the Faculty website)

Ostrom will also participate in a program co-sponsored by the University of Wisconsin Law School and the Law School's Program in Real Estate, Land Use, and Community Development. Wisconsin Real Estate's Stephen Malpezzi will be a panelist in the program as well. They will be joined by Professor Daniel Bromley (Department of Agriculture and Applied Economics), Professor Neil Komesar (Law School), and Professor Melissa Scanlan (Law School and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee's School of Freshwater Sciences). They will discuss how common-pool resource issues are relevant in his or her field and how law and policy have/have not or should/should not develop to address such issues.
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