Wisconsin School of Business

Sung Kim

Associate Professor - Operations & Information Management

Sung S. Kim is an associate professor in the Department of Operations and Information Management at the Wisconsin School of Business.

His research covers broad issues related to online user behavior including habit, addiction, loyalty, switching costs, information privacy and security, gaming, community participation, and social networking. His research has appeared in Information Systems Research, MIS Quarterly, Management Science, Journal of Management Information Systems, Journal of the Association for Information Systems, and Decision Sciences.

Kim was ranked third worldwide in terms of top-level IS journal publications between 2007 and 2009. He served as an associate editor of Information Systems Research.

He holds a B.S. in electronic engineering from Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea, an M.S. in information systems from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, and a Ph.D. in in information technology management with a minor in industrial and systems engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

 

Selected Accepted Journal Articles


Ray, S., Kim, S., & Morris, J. (2014). The Central Role of Engagement in Online Communities. Information Systems Research
Ma, X., Kim, S., & Kim, S. (2013). Online Gambling Behavior: The Impacts of Cumulative Outcomes, Recent Outcomes, and Prior Use.
Article AbstractThe objective of this study is to examine various psychological forces underlying the behavior of people’s online gambling, an increasingly popular form of entertainment in the worldwide gaming industry. Drawing on extant theories, we first developed a model of how cumulative outcomes, recent outcomes, and prior use affect online gambling behavior differently. We empirically tested the model using longitudinal panel data collected over eight months from 22,304 actual users of a gambling website. The results of a multilevel panel data analysis strongly supported our hypotheses. First, consistent with gambling theory, individuals’ online gambling was found to increase with any increase in a cumulative net gain or cumulative net loss. Second, as the availability heuristic prescribes, a recent loss reduced online gambling, whereas a recent gain increased it. Third, consistent with the literature on repeated behavior, regular use and extended use moderated the relationship between current and subsequent gambling. Taken together, the present study clarifies how people react differently to immediate and cumulative outcomes and also how regular use and extended use facilitate routine behavior in the context of online gambling. In general, our findings suggest that the three perspectives, i.e., gambling theory, the availability heuristic, and repeated behavior, should be taken into account to understand online gambling, which is in essence a series of risk-taking attempts with the potential of eventually becoming routine behavior. This study is expected to offer valuable insights into other types of online games that could engage people in risking real or cyber money and at the same time could be easily enmeshed with everyday life (e.g., fantasy sports, online virtual worlds).
Information Systems Research

Selected Published Journal Articles


Ma, X., Khansa, L., Deng, Y., & Kim, S. (2013). Impact of Prior Reviews on the Subsequent Review Process in Reputation Systems.
Article AbstractReputation systems have been recognized as particularly successful online review communities and word-of-mouth channels. Our study draws upon the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) to analyze the extent that the characteristics of reviewers and their early reviews reduce or worsen the bias of subsequent online reviews. Investigating the sources of this bias and ways to mitigate it is of considerable importance given the previously established significant impact of online reviews on consumers’ purchasing decisions and on businesses’ profitability. Based on a panel dataset of 744 individual consumers collected from Yelp.com, we used the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation method to develop and empirically test a system of simultaneous models of consumer review behavior. Our results reveal that male reviewers or those who lack experience, geographical mobility, or social connectedness are more prone to being influenced by prior reviews. We also found that longer and more frequent reviews can reduce online reviews’ biases. This paper is among the first to examine the moderating effects of reviewer and review characteristics on the relationship between prior reviews and subsequent reviews. Practically, this study offers businesses effective customer relationship management strategies to improve their reputations and expand their clientele.
Journal of Management Information Systems (30), 279-310.
Ray, S., Kim, S., & Morris, J. (2012). Online Users' Switching Costs: Their Nature and Formation. Information Systems Research (23), 197-213. doi: 10.1287/isre.1100.0340.
Ray, S., Ow, T., & Kim, S. (2011). Security Assurance: How Online Service Providers Can Influence Security Control Perceptions and Gain Trust. Decision Sciences (42), 391-412. doi: 10.1111/j.1540-5915.2011.00316.x.

Undergraduate Courses


Analysis and Design of Computer-Based Systems
Course DescriptionAnalysis of business systems to identify possible need for new or improved computer-based systems and the design of systems to meet those needs.
(INS 424), Fall 2006.

Analysis and Design of Computer-Based Systems
Course DescriptionAnalysis of business systems to identify possible need for new or improved computer-based systems and the design of systems to meet those needs.
(INS 424 Section 1), Fall 2007.

Computer-Based Data Management
Course DescriptionUse, control and administration of centralized and distributed data bases. Topics include the definition, design, creation, revision, interrogation, update, security and integrity of data bases.
(INS 422), Fall 2001.

Computer-Based Data Management
Course DescriptionUse, control and administration of centralized and distributed data bases. Topics include the definition, design, creation, revision, interrogation, update, security and integrity of data bases.
(MIS 422), Fall 2002.

Contemporary Topics (OIM 365), Spring 2002.

Contemporary Topics (OIM 365), Spring 2003.

Contemporary Topics (I S 365), Fall 2010.



Graduate Courses


Seminar-Data Processing
Course DescriptionIndependent reading and systems designs emphasizing computers, analytic methods, and research techniques applied to current business problems.
(INS 872), Spring 2005.

Contemporary Topics (OTM 765 Section 1), Fall 2010.



Combined Undergraduate & Graduate Courses


Computer-Based Data Mgt
Course DescriptionUse, control and administration of centralized and distributed data bases. Topics include the definition, design, creation, revision, interrogation, update, security and integrity of data bases.
(INS/INS 722/422 Section 1), Spring 2009.

Anal&Dsgn:Comptr-Based Sys
Course DescriptionAnalysis of business systems to identify possible need for new or improved computer-based systems and the design of systems to meet those needs.
(INS/INS 724/424 Section 1), Spring 2009.

Computer-Based Data Management
Course DescriptionUse, control and administration of centralized and distributed data bases. Topics include the definition, design, creation, revision, interrogation, update, security and integrity of data bases.
(INS/INS 422/722), Spring 2002.

Contemporary Topics (OIM/OIM 365/765), Fall 2003.

Computer-Based Data Management
Course DescriptionUse, control and administration of centralized and distributed data bases. Topics include the definition, design, creation, revision, interrogation, update, security and integrity of data bases.
(INS/INS 422/722), Spring 2003.

Contemporary Topics (OIM/OIM 765/365), Fall 2004.

Computer-Based Data Management
Course DescriptionUse, control and administration of centralized and distributed data bases. Topics include the definition, design, creation, revision, interrogation, update, security and integrity of data bases.
(INS/INS 422/722), Spring 2004.

Contemporary Topics (OIM/OIM 365/765), Spring 2004.

Contemporary Topics (OIM/OIM 365/765), Spring 2005.

Computer-Based Data Management
Course DescriptionUse, control and administration of centralized and distributed data bases. Topics include the definition, design, creation, revision, interrogation, update, security and integrity of data bases.
(INS/INS 722/422), Spring 2006.

Contemporary Topics (OIM/OIM 765/365), Spring 2006.

Analysis and Design of Computer-Based Systems
Course DescriptionAnalysis of business systems to identify possible need for new or improved computer-based systems and the design of systems to meet those needs.
(INS/INS 724/424), Spring 2006.

Computer-Based Data Mgt
Course DescriptionUse, control and administration of centralized and distributed data bases. Topics include the definition, design, creation, revision, interrogation, update, security and integrity of data bases.
(INS/INS 722/422 Section 2), Fall 2009.

Contemporary Topics (INS/INS 765/365 Section 1), Fall 2009.

Contemporary Topics (INS/INS 365/765 Section 1), Spring 2010.

Computer-Based Data Management
Course DescriptionUse, control and administration of centralized and distributed data bases. Topics include the definition, design, creation, revision, interrogation, update, security and integrity of data bases.
(INS/INS 722/422 Section 1), Spring 2007.

Analysis and Design of Computer-Based Systems
Course DescriptionAnalysis of business systems to identify possible need for new or improved computer-based systems and the design of systems to meet those needs.
(INS/INS 724/424 Section 1), Spring 2007.

Computer-Based Data Mgt
Course DescriptionUse, control and administration of centralized and distributed data bases. Topics include the definition, design, creation, revision, interrogation, update, security and integrity of data bases.
(INS/INS 722/422 Section 1), Spring 2008.

Anal&Dsgn:Comptr-Based Sys
Course DescriptionAnalysis of business systems to identify possible need for new or improved computer-based systems and the design of systems to meet those needs.
(INS/INS 724/424 Section 1), Spring 2008.



Photograph of Sung Kim

Sung Kim

 
Associate Professor | Operations & Information Management
(608) 262-3481
3120 Grainger Hall